17 February 2017

New Commission: Rob Crosse, Prime Time

Prime Time is the title of both a new film commission and the first major solo exhibition in a public gallery by the artist Rob Crosse. Through his films and photographs, Crosse studies the collective and private behaviour within organised social groups made up predominantly of men. Focusing his attention towards amateur societies, such as a slot car racing club or a railway signalling group, Crosse spends long periods of time with the participants who become the eventual subjects of his work. Through this research and personal involvement, his work becomes a platform from which to construct intimate and reflective portraits while unearthing unexpected moments of exchange between his subjects. 

Crosse’s latest film Prime Time (2017) will be shown for the first time in the exhibition and has been commissioned by FVU with Grundy Art Gallery. The film focuses on a group of older gay men who are part of a social society called ‘Prime Timers’ as they undertake an organised cruise. The filming of the ship’s interminable journey towards the horizon becomes an allegory for the search these men undertake by coming together to enrich their lives through communal activity. Prime Time examines what it means to be in the prime of one’s life and seeks to challenge the hyper-visibility of youth, and its primacy as a measure of desirability, to the exclusion of older bodies.

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Two newly commissioned moving-image works by recipients of the 2017 Awards, Patrick Hough and Lawrence Lek, will premiere at an exhibition at Jerwood Space, London, 22 March - 14 May 2017.  

In response to 2017's curatorial theme, Neither One Thing or Another, Hough and Lek both employ pioneering, conceptually fitting, technologies to examine the steadily blurring line between the real and the artificial. In Geomancer, Lek harnesses his trademark - the building blocks of computer gaming technology - to set the stage for an awakening of artificial intelligence. Hough’s film And If In A Thousand Years takes us to the Californian desert, where the landscape was filmed and digitally scanned using LiDAR, to host a Hollywood-inspired merging of authenticity and replica. Both works delve between definitions of consciousness, and in the process invite us to look again at what we think we know and see.

Since their selection in May 2016, the artists have each received £20,000 to develop the works, with full production support from FVU. Following their debut at Jerwood Space in London, the films will tour as a series of screening events nationwide.

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